23 Untranslatable Foreign Words That Describe Love Better Than You Ever Thought

We have several words to describe love in English yet still, there are some shades within the spectrum of that emotion we haven’t been able to capture in our own language.

Source: thoughtcatalog.com

The languages we speak, shape our ideas, communications, and possibilities.  There are many ideas that I used to be able to express better in Spanish than I could in English (even though English is my first language, some Spanish words seem to capture the essence of my emotions in a more enriching and satistfying than in English). If you want to try any of these out for Valentine’s Day, be my guest, but if it get’s you in trouble, it’s not my fault!    

 

Tags: language, culture.

Explore Petra on Google Maps

“Join Queen Rania Al Abdullah of Jordan and wander through the lost city of Petra in Street View http://goo.gl/ixZRa9

Source: www.youtube.com

I was first introduced to Petra as by the movie  Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade where it was ‘cast’ as the Canyon of the Cresent Moon.  Unfortunately the tourist economy of this site is hampered by regional conflicts in Syria and Iraq, warding away many would-be tourists in recent years.  If a digital exploration is all that is your pocketbook can handle, take this virtual tour of one of the wonders of the world. 

 

Tags: Jordan, googlemapping, virtual tours, geospatial, edtech.

Mesmerizing Migration: Watch 118 Bird Species Migrate

“For the first time, scientists at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology have documented migratory movements of bird populations spanning the entire year for 118 species throughout the Western Hemisphere. The study finds broad similarity in the routes used by specific groups of species—vividly demonstrated by animated maps showing patterns of movement across the annual cycle. The results of these analyses were published today in the Proceedings of the Royal Society B.

Source: www.allaboutbirds.org

This still image above doesn’t do justice to this animated map of bird migrations (species key here).  While modern humans by and large are tied to particular plots of land, not all species have that same approach to gathering and using resources.  On #DarwinDay, it is important to consider the connections between biology and geography.   

 

Tagsphysicalecology, biogeography, environment, mapping, scale, location.

Mesmerizing Migration: Watch 118 Bird Species Migrate

“For the first time, scientists at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology have documented migratory movements of bird populations spanning the entire year for 118 species throughout the Western Hemisphere. The study finds broad similarity in the routes used by specific groups of species—vividly demonstrated by animated maps showing patterns of movement across the annual cycle. The results of these analyses were published today in the Proceedings of the Royal Society B.

Source: www.allaboutbirds.org

This still image above doesn’t do justice to this animated map of bird migrations (species key here).  While modern humans by and large are tied to particular plots of land, not all species have that same approach to gathering and using resources. 

 

Tagsphysicalecology, biogeography, environment, mapping, scale, location.

The Role of Rural Women in Agriculture

“Women are the backbone of the development of rural and national economies. They comprise 43% of the world’s agricultural labor force, which rises to 70% in some countries. In Africa, 80% of the agricultural production comes from small farmers, who are mostly rural women. Women comprise the largest percentage of the workforce in the agricultural sector, but do not have access and control over all land and productive resources. Realizing the importance of rural women in agriculture is an important aspect of gender relations. In many countries, the role of women in agriculture is considered just to be a ‘help’ and not an important economic contribution to agricultural production. Giving support to rural women is a way of breaking the vicious cycle that leads to rural poverty and to the expansion of slums in the cities, where the poor get poorer. Development strategies should consider rural women as the epicenter, paying special attention to their social skills both within and without agriculture sector.”

Source: www.wfo-oma.com

While rural women play a substantial role in agriculture around the world, it is often not in positions of ownership, regional influence, and agency.  This is an article discussing how empowering rural women in the agricultural sector by changed the cultural and economic institutions that shape their work can truly change the world we live in.  

 

Tags: gender in agriculture, developmentgender, agriculture, labor. 

The Danger Of GMOs: Is It All In Your Mind?

Genetically modified foods are often regarded as “unnatural” and approached with distrust. Commentator Tania Lombrozo considers the psychology behind these reactions.

 

Why do so many people oppose genetically modified organisms, or GMOs? According to a new paper forthcoming in the journal Trends in Plant Science, it’s because opposition to GMOs taps into deep cognitive biases. These biases conspire to make arguments against GMOs intuitive and compelling, whether or not they’re backed by strong evidence.

The authors of the paper — a mix of philosophers and biologists — turn to research in the cognitive sciences to shed light on the mismatch between the public’s perception of GMOs (which is fairly negative, especially in Europe) and the state of the evidence about their safety (which is fairly positive).

 

Tags: GMOstechnology, agriculture.

Source: www.npr.org

Glaciology in Greenland

“Sharyn Alfonsi goes to the top of the world to report on scientists trying to get to the bottom of climate change and sea level rise by studying one of the largest glaciers in the Arctic Circle.”

Source: www.cbsnews.com

The 13 minute video clip from the show “60 Minutes” is a good introduction to the importance and difficulty of studying glacial melt, climate change, and the impacts of a receding ice sheet.  

 

Tags: physical, erosion, climate change, Greenland.

Historical Figures, Campus Controversies

Around the world, student activists are demanding that building and statutes commemorating historically figures whose legacies are now seen as morally dubious.

 

A new wave of international student activism has targeted names, mascots, statues and other symbols of historical figures at colleges and universities. Activists argue that the symbols should be removed as offensive reminders of hatred and violence. Many school officials acknowledge the historical complexities, but they argue that a better approach would be to teach students about the morally questionable acts of the past. Still others defend the symbols as harmless traditions.

Source: www.nytimes.com

Everyone who was been on a road trip with me knows I love monuments and statues.  As markers of memory, history, and place, monuments both reflect regional identity and are simultaneouly used to reshape how we think about communal identities.  Consequently, they can be hotly contested or be seen as a great unifying symbol.  This article has some great examples from the news about how identity and heritage are being recontructed with some controversial monuments. 

  • Jefferson Davis at UTexas
  • Brown U and Slave Trade
  • Harvard and ‘Veritas’
  • Amherst and its namesake
  • John Calhoun and Clemson/Yale
  • Cecil Rhodes at Oxford and Cape Town

Tags: historical, monuments, landscape.