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Mapping Reading Preferences

We took a look at how some of your favorite genres play out across the country.

Source: trends.audible.com

Audible is one of the world’s largest audio book distributors and they have recently mapped out their customers buying patterns at the state level, looking at nine genres.  

 

Questions to Ponder: What patterns do you see in this set of maps?  What cultural and economic factors help to explain the spatial patterns that you see? 

 

Tagsmapping, cultureEnglish.

Maps as a Common Core Reading Tool

“Did you know know that there are some excellent reading opportunities in Story Maps? This map serves as a table of contents for using Story Maps with Common Core Reading Standards.  Reinventing the wheel isn’t necessary with so many great maps and data sources that will help us teaching reading, writing and thinking with engaging content and little effort.”

Seth Dixon‘s insight:

The recently revised Geography for Life standards have been aligned to show how geographic skills can be taught within the Common Core framework.  The National Geographic Society, in cooperation with the National Council for Geographic Education and the Network of Alliances for Geographic Education created Connections to be that link (for grade specific Common Core/Geography resources click here). 

So how is this to be done? This storymap shows ten great examples of maps that can be used as reading documents, one for each of the 10 ELA Reading Standards. 

TagsmappingEnglish, GISESRIgeography education, geospatial, edtech.

See on www.barbareeduke.com

What Do We Mean by ‘Reading’ Maps?

The common-core standards present an ambiguous message on how to draw information from maps and charts, Phil Gersmehl says.

Seth Dixon‘s insight:

Written by Phil Gersmehl, the author of Teaching Geography, this article shows how teachers can read maps to gather contextual information about places in a way that fosters deeper learning.  The Common Core ELA standards emphasize a “close reading,” but the examples of reading of maps and charts are often rather superficial.  The National Geographic has recently produced Interconnections to be a guide for teachers of both geography and English to see how the two are interrelated and to promote geo-literacy for a more profound appreciation for spatial analysis and place-based knowledge.    

TagsEnglish, National Geographic, geography education, spatial, teacher training, mapping.

See on www.edweek.org

2018 APHG Reading Professional Development

This has been my first year as Chief Reader of the AP Human Geography reading and it is amazing to watch all the moving parts come together.  It couldn’t happen without such dedicated, professional, and passionate geography educators all working together.  I was delighted to have Dr. Marie Price, President of the American Geographical Society, be our professional development night speaker and she was outstanding.  Her talk, MIGRATION AS A CROSSCUTTING THEME IN HUMAN GEOGRAPHY,  proved that her geographic expertise is only matched by her teaching prowess; the audience was riveted (PDF of slides here).

MariePrice_JM

NIGHT OF THE ROUND TABLES: Thursday evening, June 7th we had our annual “Night of the Round Tables” event. This event was designed to create a place to share new ideas, pick up lesson plans, discover new resources, and develop strategies for teaching geography. Presenters had 15 minutes to present. Below are (or will be soon) the digital copies of the presentations and the handouts that they wanted to share:

Keynote Address at the AP Human Geography Reading

“I gave the keynote at the AP Human Geography reading, entitled The Age of Geotechnologies:  Five Converging Forces, available here.  The keynote was given as an Esri storymap!  It was a great honor to give this presentation and interact with some of the world’s finest geography educators!”

 

TagsAPHG, storymapgeography education, teacher training, ESRI.

Source: www.josephkerski.com

Why Children Still Need to Read (and Draw) Maps

While many skills have become obsolete in the digital age, map reading remains an important tool for building children’s spatial reasoning skills and helping them make sense of our world.

Source: www.pbs.org

Young people need to develop a mental map of their environs and an over-reliance on GPS/mapping apps are no substitute.  When these youth become drivers, they are unprepared to make spatially/navigational decisions because they lack map reading skills.  They might think that their apps can do all the work and that an old fashioned paper map is outdated technology, but their spatial thinking skills become atrophied. Spatial skills are crucial for understanding the world as a global citizen, to understand your local environs and for making scientific discoveries.  So teach a kid how to read a map…the sooner the better. 

 

‘Sedated by software’: No one knows how to read maps anymore, experts say

The Royal Institute of Navigation are concerned about the nation’s cartographical know-how and have suggested schools start teaching basic navigation.

Source: mashable.com

Today, many are unable to navigate without GPS devices, but they still need to learn map reading skills. They are convinced that their apps can do all the work and that an old fashioned paper map is outdated technology, but their spatial thinking skills become atrophied. Spatial skills are crucial for understanding the world as a global citizen, to understand your local environs and for making scientific discoveries.  So teach a kid how to read a map…the sooner the better. 

 

Tagsmapping, K12, location.

Analyzing Maps to Better Understand Global Current Events and History

In this lesson, we provide strategies to help students accurately interpret maps, and we suggest ways for using current event maps as a tool to better understand both history and what’s going on in the world today.

Source: learning.blogs.nytimes.com

Many of the more fortunate students (access to portable electronic devices, multi-car families with parents who drive them around, etc.) are actually worse off in map reading skills in part because they have never needed to develop a mental map and are not adept at navigating their neighborhoods (in the last few generations most and the range that part).  When these children become drivers, they are unable to navigate without GPS devices, but they still need to learn map reading skills. They are convinced that their apps can do all the work and that an old fashioned paper map is outdated technology, but their spatial thinking skills become atrophied. Spatial skills are crucial for understanding the world as a global citizen, to understand your local environs and for making scientific discoveries.  So teach a kid how to read a map…the sooner the better. 

 

Tagsmapping, K12, scale, location.

My daughter can’t read a map. And your kid probably can’t either

Ask any teenager for directions and he can pull up Google Maps quicker than you can recite an address. Pretty awesome, right? And I’ll be the first to admit that having a map in my phone that not only tells me where to turn but how long it will take me to get there is pretty amazing. I use it all the time, honestly. But even when I’m zoning out and listening to that soothing voice telling me where to turn, I have a mental picture in my head of her directions. And I never realized that my teenage daughter doesn’t have a map in her head, because she’s never really had to use one. Ever.

Tagseducation, K12geography educationspatial, mapping.

Source: www.washingtonpost.com

Many of the more fortunate students (access to portable electronic devices, multi-car families with parents who drive them around, etc.) are actually worse off in map reading skills in part because they have never needed to develop a mental map and are not adept at navigating their neighborhoods (in the last few generations most and the range that part).  When these children become drivers, they are unable to navigate without GPS devices, but they still need to learn map reading skills. They are convinced that their apps can do all the work and that an old fashioned paper map is outdated technology, but their spatial thinking skills become atrophied. Spatial skills are crucial for understanding the world as a global citizen, to understand your local environs and for making scientific discoveries.  So teach a kid how to read a map…the sooner the better. 

Five reasons why we should still read maps

The Royal Institute of Navigation says reliance on sat-navs is undermining map-reading skills. So why should we still read maps?

Source: www.bbc.com

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