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"South China Sea"

Territorial Disputes in the Waters Near China

See on Scoop.itGeography Education

China has recently increased its pursuit of territorial claims in nearby seas, leading to tense exchanges with neighboring countries. A map of some of the most notable disputes.

Seth Dixon‘s insight:

Many of the geopolitical conflicts in the East Pacific have their roots in the territorial disputes over islands that at first glance seem as if they wouldn’t be worth the trouble.  However, since the the UNCLOS agreement gives countries 200 nautical miles off their coasts to be an Exclusive Economic Zone, that greatly enhanced the strategic value of controlling these islands.  This interactive map briefly highlights some of the details behind the conflicts with links for further readings.  


Questions to Ponder: Why do countries care so much about some minor islands?  Why would other countries not want to accept China’s territorial assertions?  Experts are saying that Chinese-Japanese relations are as bad as they’ve been since the end of World War II–Why all the commotion? 


Tags: borders, political, conflict, China, East Asia.

See on www.nytimes.com

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In the East China Sea, a Far Bigger Test of Power Looms

 

In an era when the United States has been focused on new forms of conflict, the dangerous contest suddenly erupting in the East China Sea seems almost like a throwback to the Cold War.

Seth Dixon‘s insight:

China has been very aggressive in how they assert their territorial claims in both the South and East China Sea.  China is claiming control over the airspace of the East China Sea and the Senkaku Islands. While the U.S. government rejects this claim, they are encouraging commercial airlines to comply with China’s request that all flight is this zone submit their flight plans to the Chinese government.  Japan, on the other hand, does not want the Chinese to have this as a symbolic victory that would further legitimize their political control over this space.  Why does China care so much about some minor islands?  Why would other countries not want to accept China’s territorial assertions?

Tags: borders, political, conflict, China, Japan, East Asia.

See on www.nytimes.com

ChinaAir

PACIFIC-popup

Alarm as China Issues Rules for Disputed Area

New rules announced last week to allow interceptions of ships in the South China Sea are raising concerns in the region, and in Washington, that simmering disputes with Southeast Asian countries over the waters will escalate.

According to this new announcement, Chinese ships would be allowed to search and repel foreign ships if they were engaged in illegal activities (but that is open to interpretation) if the ships were within the 12-nautical-mile zone surrounding islands that China claims. This makes the disputed territorial claims of China all the more at the center of this geopolitical maneuverings.  Much of the South China Sea would then be under Chinese control if this announcement become the new reality. 

Questions to Ponder: Why is China making this announcement?  Is China within their rights to make this declaration?  Who might oppose this? 

See on www.nytimes.com

Why everyone should take a geography class, especially now

Geographical literacy remains vital—particularly for those of us who live in (for the time being at least) the world’s preeminent military and economic superpower. Geography is necessary for understanding why the overthrow of a government in Libya contributed to an unprecedented surge of migrants into Europe, why Ukraine has been split between East and West amid its conflict with Russia, and why China’s neighbors are alarmed at the new islands under construction in the South China Sea. And as we learned during last year’s Ebola panic, an understanding of African geography could have helped explain why an outbreak in West Africa should not lead to the quarantining of people from Kenya or Tanzania. In the years to come, as the effects of climate change on everything from sea level rise to deforestation to drought quite literally reshape the world we live in, an understanding of geography will be necessary for mitigating and adapting to the consequences.

Source: www.slate.com

A basic understanding of geography is a prerequisite for any informed citizen, and globalization means that is even more important than ever.  

TagseducationK12geography education.

Why the Plan to Dig a Canal Across Nicaragua Could Be a Very Bad Idea

“By the end of this year, digging could begin on a waterway that would stretch roughly 180 miles across Nicaragua to unite the Atlantic and Pacific oceans.”

Seth Dixon‘s insight:

Today, the largest of the massive cargo ships are simply too big to get through the Panama Canal and have to travel down around the tip of South America; China is strategically working on strengthening their geopolitical position in the South China Sea and all international waters.  This is one reason why a Chinese firms are planning to construct a canal to rival Panama’s.  This article highlights the reasons for concern (Maps 101 readers can read more about the geographic implications of Nicaragua’s plans in this article co-authored by myself and Julie Dixon or you can sign up for a free trial subscription to see what else Maps 101 has to offer). 

Tags: transportation, Nicaragua, globalization, diffusion, industry, economic.

See on www.wired.com

Political and Economic Geography Presentations

6 conference presentations on various economic and political geography topics given at NCGE 2013 as a part of the APHG strand.

Seth Dixon‘s insight:

The last two mornings in Denver, CO there was a series of presentations of economic and political geography given in front of a capacity crowd.  6 of the educators have agreed to share the slides of their presentations with the broader geography education community and you can access them all here.  See also this livebinder with resources for teaching APHG to 9th graders (which can be adapted to older students as well).  This was a fantastic professional development event and we are all thankful that they were willing to share these resources.  

Tags: APHG, NCGE, political, economic.

POLITICAL GEOGRAPHY SESSION for the APHG strand at NCGE 2013

Don Zeigler

Lili Monk

Ken Keller

ECONOMIC GEOGRAPHY SESSION of APHG strand at NCGE 2013

Paul Gray

Rick Gindele

Ken Keller

Gender empowerment in agriculture and development

Political and Economic Geography Presentations

6 conference presentations on various economic and political geography topics given at NCGE 2013 as a part of the APHG strand.

The last two mornings in Denver, CO there was a series of presentations of economic and political geography given in front of a capacity crowd.  6 of the educators have agreed to share the slides of their presentations with the broader geography education community and you can access them all here.  See also this livebinder with resources for teaching APHG to 9th graders (which can be adapted to older students as well).  This was a fantastic professional development event and we are all thankful that they were willing to share these resources.

Tags: APHG, NCGE, political, economic.

POLITICAL GEOGRAPHY SESSION for the APHG strand at NCGE 2013
Don Zeigler
South China Sea NCGE 2013 Don Zeigler
Lili Monk
Malvinas Lili Monk NCGE 2013
Ken Keller
Scottish devolution and nationalism, Kenneth Keller
ECONOMIC GEOGRAPHY SESSION of APHG strand at NCGE 2013
Paul Gray
APHG with Sports #NCGE2013–Paul Gray
Rick Gindele
Economic Geography Rick Gindele NCGE 2013
Ken Keller
Gender empowerment in agriculture and development

The Disputed Spratly Islands

See on Scoop.itGeography Education

link to part 2 http://youtu.be/I5t9wpEzKRc or http://youtu.be/myNxTaW5z3w link to part 3 http://youtu.be/7mJK4Sgxrbw...

 

This video clip shows the historical background of the political and economic factors that have lead to competing claims in the South China Sea.  The Exclusive conomic Zone (EEZ) with projected oil fields is the main prize and China has been flexing it’s regional muscles. 

See on www.youtube.com

Indonesia chooses a new capital

Capital Indonesia

“Indonesia will build a new capital city on the island of Borneo, home to some of the world’s biggest coal reserves and orangutan habitats, as President Joko Widodo seeks to ease pressure on congested and sinking Jakarta. The relocation of the capital, some 1,400km away from Jakarta, will help spread economic activity outside the nation’s most populous island of Java.”
Jakarta is a megacity that will continue to grow, but it is a sinking city–in fact, the fastest sinking city in the world. The pressures of being the primate city are enormous–the rush hour traffic is considered one of the worst in the world and the continued centralization of government in Jakarta limits economic group in other regions of the country.  This plan to create a forward capital to encourage growth in Borneo and attempt to limit growth in Jakarta will be fascinating to monitor.  For more on forward capitals, here is a BBC article with 5 other examples of countries that have changed their capital cities.

 

GeoEd Tags: Indonesia, megacities, urban ecology, governance, urban politics, SouthEast Asia.

Jakarta
Jakarta is overcrowded, polluted, and sinking.

 

These cities will be very rich in 10 years

Forget New York, London or Hong Kong. Here are seven cities that are racing up the rankings of the world’s richest, and will be among the top 10 by 2025, according to researchers from McKinsey.

Source: money.cnn.com

  1. Doha, Qatar
  2. Bergen, Norway
  3. Trondheim, Norway
  4. Hwaseong, South Korea
  5. Asan, South Korea
  6. Rhine Ruhr, Germany
  7. Macau, China

Tagsurbandevelopment, economic, planninglaborglobalization, technology.

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