Using State Maps in School

“Have you ever seen a map and marveled over all of the information that it contains? It is incredible how maps can capture so much of the real world and depict so many places. From big cities to small towns, maps use characteristics such as topography, hydrography, industry, and recreation to tell the story of a place.”

Seth Dixon‘s insight:

National Geographic Education has just finished producing all of 50 State Tabletop Mapmaker kits which focus on basic mapping skills for younger audiences.  This set of tiled 8.5 x 11 sheets really expands what you can do and to help educators know what to do with these resources, they wrote this article that shows 9 ways to use these new state maps in your classroom.  I’m looking forward to printing off the Rhode Island state map!

TagsNational Geographic. mapping, K12.

See on blog.education.nationalgeographic.com

CT map

Economic Decline and Sense of Place

West Virginia, Still Home from Hollow Interactive on Vimeo.

“McDowell County, situated in the coalfields of West Virginia, has experienced a great boom-and-bust since 1950. But despite the economic decline and population loss, many still call it home and feel a great sense of purpose among the mountains. Residents speak about their connection to this place and the meaning of ‘home.’ Hear more stories at hollowdocumentary.com

Seth Dixon‘s insight:

This video perfectly exemplifies some key geographic ideas; sense of place, regional economic decline, migration and resource extraction.  This video would be great to shows students and then get them to analyze the geographic context that creates a place like McDowell County, West Virginia.  This will be a great addition to my Place-Based Geography Videos StoryMap.  

Tagseconomicplace, industry, location, migration, APHG, poverty, socioeconomic,

The Science behind Google Earth

See on Scoop.itGeography Education

“Google is using a new technology to automatically generate  3D buildings from 45-degree angle aerial photography made by overlapping passes of aircraft.  The aerial photos are combined to create 3D models.”

Seth Dixon‘s insight:

Some of the nuts and bolts behind Google Earth might be difficult to replicate in the computer lab, but it is critical to conceptually understand how geospatial data is used today.  This series of images shows how important remote sensing is for our modern digital mapping platforms.  

Tags: cartography, visualization, mappingremote sensing, google.

See on worldcadaccess.typepad.com

Why It’s a Big Deal That Half of the Great Lakes Are Still Covered in Ice

See on Scoop.itGeography Education

“More than 200 million tons of cargo, mostly iron ore, coal, and grain, travel across the Great Lakes throughout the year. Even a little ice can make a big dent on this total. Only three shipments of coal were loaded up during March – 69 percent less, by volume, than last year.  A sluggish start to the shipping season is just one of the cascading effects of the Midwest’s cold and icy winter. Some are good, and will allow the region to recover from years of historically low water levels. Others, like this delayed shipping season, less so.”

See on www.theatlanticcities.com

Can You Identify These Cities From Their Light Signatures?

See on Scoop.itGeography Education

“The light that a city emits is like its glowing fingerprint. From the orderly grid of Manhattan, to the sprawling, snaking streets of Milan, to the bright contrast of Kuwait’s ring-roads, each city leaves its own pattern of tiny glowing dots. See if you can ID these cities based on the way they shine.”

Seth Dixon‘s insight:

This short quiz of 16 cities combines several analytic components of geography that you won’t see in more standard map quizzes for regional geography;  this draws on some similar skills similar to the map quiz that was based on identifying the city based on Starbucks locations.  Some recognition of local spatial patterns from previous map analysis can make this quiz easier but there are still some cities that you haven’t ever looked at from space before.  Things to consider as you attempt this quiz:  Which of the four possible selections can you rule out out?  What enabled you to eliminate those selections (e.g.-coastal, scale, size, grid pattern, transportation systems, density, etc.)?  What does to layout of the city tell us about the planning and historical origins of the city?  Is there one urban model that best helps us explain the configuration of this city?     

Tags: urbanmodels, planning, density, urbanism, unit 7 citiestrivia.

See on nautil.us

Largest glacier calving ever filmed

See on Scoop.itGeography Education

“On May 28, 2008, Adam LeWinter and Director Jeff Orlowski filmed a historic breakup at the Ilulissat Glacier in Western Greenland. The calving event lasted for 75 minutes and the glacier retreated a full mile across a calving face three miles wide. The height of the ice is about 3,000 feet, 300-400 feet above water and the rest below water.”

Tags: physical, geomorphology, landforms, erosion, climate change, Greenland.

See on www.youtube.com

Quebec Voters Say ‘Non’ to Separatists

See on Scoop.itGeography Education

“Quebec voters gave a resounding no to the prospects of holding a third referendum on independence from Canada, handing the main separatist party handing the main separatist party in the French-speaking province one of its worst electoral defeats ever.”  

Quebec, which is 80 percent French-speaking, has plenty of autonomy already. The province of 8.1 million sets its own income tax, has its own immigration policy favoring French speakers, and has legislation prioritizing French over English.  But many Quebecois have long dreamed of an independent Quebec, as they at times haven’t felt respected and have worried about the survival of their language in English-speaking North America.

TagsCanadapolitical, conflict, devolution.

See on www.nbcnews.com

New York City’s Disappearing Mom-and-Pop Storefronts

See on Scoop.itGeography Education

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Two photographers set out to see what happened to small family businesses in New York City in a decade.

Seth Dixon‘s insight:

The cultural landscapes of neighborhoods can change quickly as larger global economic forces restructure the places.  This is a great gallery of photos from the Smithsonian to document these changes in New York City.  Many mourn the passing of what once was as the landscape continues to be made and remade but subsequent generations.

Tags: culture, landscape, NYCeconomic, urban place, neighborhood.

See on www.smithsonian.com

 

Culture Ministry Affirms ‘Russia is not Europe’

See on Scoop.itGeography Education

“A state commission working on a much-discussed report titled ‘Foundations of State Cultural Politics’ will release their findings in two weeks, presidential advisor Vladimir Tolstoi announced last week, adding that the basic formula of the report could be summarized as ‘Russia is not Europe.

Seth Dixon‘s insight:

At times Russia has sought to be perceived as a part of Europe only to be excluded in the minds (and institutions) of Western Europe.  Now, in a discursive way to protect itself, it is reaffirming and building a cultural buffer zone between Europe and Russia.  What are the borders of Europe as you think of it?  Can world regions change over time?  Any examples of regions having their borders redrawn?  

Tags: RussiaEurope, regions.

See on www.themoscowtimes.com

How architectural innovations migrate across borders

See on Scoop.itGeography Education

“As the world’s cities undergo explosive growth, inequality is intensifying. Wealthy neighborhoods and impoverished slums grow side by side, the gap between them widening. In this eye-opening talk, architect Teddy Cruz asks us to rethink urban development from the bottom up. Sharing lessons from the slums of Tijuana, Cruz explores the creative intelligence of the city’s residents and offers a fresh perspective on what we can learn from places of scarcity.”

Seth Dixon‘s insight:

As a geographer native to the San Diego region with family on both sides of the border, I found this TED talk very compelling personally, but also rich in geographic themes (city planning, diffusion, governance of space, socioeconomic differences in land use patterns, etc.).  Relations across the border are economic, cultural and political in nature, and the merger of those varied interests have led to an uneven history of both cooperation and separation.  San Diego and Tijuana have more to offer each other than economic markets–the ideas born out of distinct socioeconomic and political contexts can be just what is needed on the other side of the border.

Tagsurban, unit 7 cities, housing, economic, sprawlneighborhood, borders. planning, urban ecology, densityplanning, TED

See on www.youtube.com