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Tanzania

How an emerging African megacity cut commutes by two hours a day

The next 15 megacities #2: Could Dar es Salaam’s experiment with Africa’s first ‘gold standard’ bus rapid transit system offer an alternative to a future dependent on private cars?

Source: www.theguardian.com

This is a good article about the critical nature of transportation infrastructure to a growing city in the developing world.  More important than this one article, I want to highlight the entire Guardian series entitled "The Next 15 Megacities." 

In 1975 there were only 3 megacities (cities population over 10 million) in the world.  Today there are 33 megacities and by 2035, there are expected to be 48.  This acceleration is one of the more astounding and important facts about how the world is changing today. This series explores these emerging megacities that will have over 10 million by 2035; overwhelmingly these cities are in Asia.  

 

GeoEd Tags: Tanzania, Africa, urban, transportation, planning, megacities, regions, APHG.

Scoop.it Tags: Tanzania, Africa, urban, transportation, planning, megacities, regions, APHG.

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Tanzania’s Albinos Face Constant Threat Of Attack

For many albinos — born with a partial or total lack of pigment in their skin, hair and eyes — life is difficult, and that is particularly true in Tanzania, where they are attacked for their flesh, the result of superstitious beliefs.

This is not a typical look at the cultural roots of prejudice and discrimination.  It isn’t racism per se (since albinism isn’t a racial category strictly speaking), but it does show prejudice that is linked to physical appearance.  There are deeply rooted folk traditions that endanger the lives of African albinos as explained in this podcast.  This photo gallery shows some of Tanzania’s albinos letting their light shine.

 

Tags: culture, racism, folk culture, Tanzania, Africa.

See on www.npr.org

In A Tanzanian Village, Elephant Poachers Thrive

In an impoverished country, elephant poaching is a quick way to make big money. A pair of poachers explain how they track and kill elephants in one of Africa’s top game reserves.

 

The illegal sale of ivory in places such as Asia drive the elephant poachers to prey on Elephants in protected game reserves and national parks.  The Selous Game Reserve is larger than Switzerland and yet they only have 10 rangers to protect and patrol the wildlife.

 

Tags: biogeography, poverty, globalization, Africa, consumption, resources, ecology, podcast.

See on www.npr.org

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