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GEOGRAPHY EDUCATION

Supporting geography educators everywhere with current digital resources.

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Illustrated APHG Textbook

Source: www.illustratedtextbook.com

If you haven’t seen any resources from the Human Imprint, this is a great source of teacher-produced AP Human Geography as well as other social studies.  This new project, the Illustrated Textbook, was created to be a “one-stop-shop for human geography fundamentals” using a fun, graphic style interlaced with content-heavy text.  I’m very excited to see this online textbook continue to unfold. This is definitely on the shortlist of best materials on this site.   

 

Tags: geography educationAPHGinfographic, textbook.

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America’s ‘Megaregions’ using Commuter Data

New maps use math to define the amorphous term.

Source: www.citylab.com

By now I’m sure many of you have seen some iteration of this research and data visualization circulating through social media outlets (you can see the article from City Lab, Atlas Obscura or an urban planning program).  We use terms like the greater metropolitan area to express the idea that areas beyond the city boundaries and even beyond the metropolitan statistical areas are linked with cities.  These ‘mega-regions’ are in part the hinterlands of a city, a functional region where the cities act as hubs of economic regions.   

Tags: regions, urban, transportationeconomicvisualization, mapping, USA, planning.

Map Men: teaching geography through comedy

Mark Cooper-Jones and Jay Foreman, the Map Men, tap into a rich vein of geographical quirks to teach through comedy

Source: geographical.co.uk

Why am I just now finding out about this resource?!?  This new YouTube channel is full of promise for geography teachers…fun, quirky, full of interesting trivia, but most importantly, these videos are rooted in geographic concepts. 

 

Tags: mappingfun, videoAPHG, geography education, unit 1 GeoPrinciples.

#GeoEdu16 Research from Routledge

As the proud publisher of both Journal of Geography and The Geography Teacher, the official publications of the National Council for Geographic Education, we couldn’t be more excited to join the NCGE in Tampa for #GeoEdu16. We will be offering NCGE members and attendees FREE ACCESS to specially selected content which reflects core themes of this special meeting: AP Human Geography, Race and Ethnicity, Climate Change and Human Migration, Coastal Geography, Geospatial Technology in the Classroom, Electoral Geography, and National Park Service!

Source: explore.tandfonline.com

The National Council for Geographic Education is having their 101th conference this week (#GeoEdu16).  The Journal of Geography and The Geography Teacher are fabulous resources produced by NCGE for geography educators (and great reasons to become a member of NCGE).  The recent APHG special edition is among the free downloads that will be available through the end of this year, so start downloading!  

 

Tags: NCGEAPHG, geography education, teacher training.

In stunning decision, Britain votes to leave the E.U.

The country opted to become the first ever to leave the 28-member bloc in a result that will send economic and political shockwaves across the globe.

Source: www.washingtonpost.com

The foundations of the European Union have their historical roots in World War II.  To ensure that European countries stop attacking each other, they knit their economies together and cooperated more on political and economic policies.   

The UK has narrowly voted to leave the European Union (52%-48%).  The Brexit (Britain + Exit) was expected to be close, but shows discontent with London.  The ‘Remain’ campaign dominated in London, Scotland and Northern Ireland while the ‘Leave’ campaign found its strength across England and Wales (see maps). 

The fallout of this vote is big and far-reaching.  The first global reaction was financial panic as numerous stock exchanges plummeted.  UK Prime Minister David Cameron will resign.  Already Spain is calling for joint control of Gibraltar (which they’ve wanted anyway) and using this as an opportunity to advance a Spanish agenda.  Many in Scotland chose to stay in the UK in part because they wanted Scotland to remain in the EU.  Another referendum on Scottish Independence feels eminent at this point.       

Still confused?  Here are answers to 9 frequently asked questions about the Brexit as well as a good overview from the Washington Post.

   

Tags: Europe, supranationalism, economic, political.

Where our food came from

“Explore the geographic origins of our food crops – where they were initially domesticated and evolved over time – and discover how important these ‘primary regions of diversity’ are to our current diets and agricultural production areas.”

Source: blog.ciat.cgiar.org

This is an incredibly rich website with great interactive maps, dynamic charts, and text with rich citations.  This is one of those resources that an entire class could use as a starting point to create 30+ distinct project.  This is definitely one of the most important and best resources that I’ve shared recently, one that I’m going to use in my class.  Where did a particular crop originally come from?  Where is it produced today?   How do these historic and current agricultural geographies change local diets and economies around the world?  All these issues can be explored with this interactive that includes, but goes beyond the Columbian Exchange

 

Tags: foodeconomicfood production, agribusiness, agriculture, APHG, unit 5 agriculture, globalizationbiogeography, ecology, diffusion.

Global Multidimensional Poverty Index

“The global Multidimensional Poverty Index (MPI) is an international measure of acute poverty covering over 100 developing countries. It complements traditional income-based poverty measures by capturing the severe deprivations that each person faces at the same time with respect to education, health and living standards.”

Source: www.ophi.org.uk

The MPI was developed out of a desire to fill some of the gaps in the HDI’s applicability and utility.  Allow me to quote the editor of one the NCGE’s journals, the Geography Teacher, on the usefulness of the MPI website for classroom use: “With the infographics, maps, graphs, country briefings, and case studies, you have a ready-made lesson activities to demonstrate patterns of fertility, mortality, and health for a population unit, and access to health care, education, utilities, and sanitation for an Industrialization and Economic Development Unit. Connections can also be made to malnutrition and water, as well as to key concepts such as pattern and scale, to key geographical skills such as how to use and think about maps and geospatial data, and to the use of online maps and online data.”  Also, this article from the World Bank also give a run-down on the key findings of the MPI in 2014. 

Tags: statisticspopulation, development, unit 2 population, unit 6 industry.

CrisisWatch: The Monthly Conflict Situation Report

Mapping global conflict month by month.

Source: crisisgroup.be

You and your students can browse through this interactive map for an update on conflict situations around the world.  The International Crisis Group is an independent, non-profit, non-governmental organization committed to preventing and resolving deadly conflict; they’ve created this interactive map to help us stay informed about the most important conflict issues around the world.  I’m placing this on my list of favorite resources as this is one worth returning to on a regular basis.

Tagsconflict, political, geopolitics, best of the best.

CrisisMap

Where Will The World’s Water Conflicts Erupt?

As the climate shifts, rivers will both flood and dry up more often, according to the latest report from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. Shortages are especially likely in parts of the world already strapped for water, so political scientists expect feuds will become even more intense. To track disputes worldwide, researchers at Oregon State University spent a decade building a comprehensive database of international exchanges—-both conflicts and alliances—over shared water resources. They found that countries often begin disputes belligerently but ultimately reach peaceful agreements. Says Aaron Wolf, the geographer who leads the project, “For me the really interesting part is how even Arabs and Israelis, Indians and Pakistanis, are able to resolve their differences and find a solution.”

Source: www.popsci.com

Too often we think of political conflicts within the framework of state borders; this mapping project divides the world into watersheds and forces us to look at global politics through a different and enlightening lens (Hi-Res image).  Oil might be the most economically valuable liquid resource, but water is the most critical for human habitation.  This infographic is reminiscent of this one, asking where the next ‘water wars’ might take place.   


Tags: water, political, unit 4 political environment, conflict, infographic

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