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GEOGRAPHY EDUCATION

Supporting geography educators everywhere with current digital resources.

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Results of the 2018 APHG Reading

Summary of the 2018 APHG reading

Source: www.slideshare.net

The Chief Reader report is not quite ready for distribution, but I gave this presentation at that AP Annual Conference in Houston this week based off of that report (PDF of slides is here).  Additionally, after the results, I discussed the importance of geographic skills that are important for our students to develop (and gave this handout on doing geography).   Overall, this slide shows that APHG, in terms of both growth and performance, did fantastic this year.

APAC

Tags: APHG, teacher training, geography education.

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2018 APHG Reading Professional Development

"This has been my first year as Chief Reader of the AP Human Geography reading and it is amazing to watch all the moving parts come together.  It couldn’t happen without such dedicated, professional, and passionate geography educators all working together.  I was delighted to have Dr. Marie Price, President of the American Geographical Society, be our professional development night speaker and she was outstanding.  Her talk, MIGRATION AS A CROSSCUTTING THEME IN HUMAN GEOGRAPHY,  proved that her geographic expertise is only matched by her teaching prowess; the audience was riveted (PDF of slides here)."

Source: geographyeducation.org

NIGHT OF THE ROUND TABLES: Thursday evening, June 7th we had our annual “Night of the Round Tables” event. This event was designed to create a place to share new ideas, pick up lesson plans, discover new resources, and develop strategies for teaching geography. Presenters had 15 minutes to present. Here you can find the digital copies of the presentations given. 

Tags: APHG, teacher training, geography education.

The Population Bomb Has Been Defused

Some of the most spectacularly wrong predictions in history have been made by those who claim that overpopulation is going to swamp the planet. Thomas Malthus, a British economist writing in the late 1700s, is the most famous of these. Extrapolating past trends into the future, he predicted that population growth would inevitably swamp available food resources, leading to mass starvation. That didn’t happen — we continued to develop new technologies that let us stay ahead of the reaper.

 

In 1968, Stanford biologist Paul Ehrlich wrote “The Population Bomb,” warning that unchecked population growth would lead to mass starvation in the 1970s. He was just as wrong as Malthus. Global population did surge, but food production managed to keep up.

 

So far, the prophets of overpopulation have been defeated by technology. But human ingenuity alone can never deliver a final victory in the battle to feed the world — eventually, population growth will overwhelm the Earth’s ability to provide calories. That’s why in order to put Malthus and Ehrlich finally to rest, a second component is needed — lower fertility rates. To save both the environment and themselves, humans must have fewer kids.

 

Fortunately, this is happening. During the lifetimes of Malthus and Ehrlich, humans still tended to have large families, with each woman bearing an average of five children over her lifetime. But shortly after Ehrlich’s book, that began to change.

Source: www.bloomberg.com

Mathusian ideas are incredibly controversial; there are articles that will proclaim that he was right and others that will point to how he got it all wrong.   The critics of Malthus see that Earth and humanity will survive as fertility rates fall almost everywhere but the Neo-Malthusians see that while fertility rates are dropping, the total population of the world continues to climb.  This article has many great fertility rate charts.  

 

Questions to Ponder: What did Malthus get right?  What did he get wrong? 

 

Tags: Malthus, op-ed, demographics, population, APHG, unit 2 population

#APHGchat–Population

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This isn’t a complete archive of yesterday’s #APHGchat on Population resources, but I’m sharing this to give a peek to the networking that is available online.  The next #APHGchat will be Oct. 18th, 9pm EST.

Tags: social media, APHG.

Source: storify.com

Introduction to AP* Human Geography

“Are you interested in what’s happening in your global community? Explore economic, social, political, and environmental issues through the lens of geography. By exploring human influences and patterns, you can better understand the world around you, make predictions, and propose solutions to current issues. In this course, you will investigate geographic perspectives and analyze historical and current patterns of migration, population, political organization of space, agriculture, food production, land use, industrialization and economic development.

In addition, you will learn helpful strategies for answering multiple-choice questions and free response essay questions on the AP Human Geography test. Each of the seven modules in this course aligns with the concepts in the Advanced Placement* Human Geography course.

This course is specifically designed for students who are interested in learning more about the AP Human Geography course before enrolling, supplementary support and exam review, and for use in blended learning classrooms.”

Source: www.edx.org

This isn’t for everyone, but if you are interested in a 14 week online course about AP Human Geography offered through the University of Texas, you might want to consider this.  It’s free (or $49 for a validated certificate to be included). For a program that offers a full Master’s degree, Elmhurst College offers one with an emphasis in AP Human Geography.     

 

Tags: APHG, teacher training, geography education.

 

2017 APHG Test Debrief

“All the tweets regarding the 2017 APHG exam2017 APHG exam from the official social media outlet of College Board, Trevor Packer, Vice President of Advanced Placement.”

Source: storify.com

2017 APHG Newsletters

Greetings from Cincinnati, OH, home of the 2017 AP Human Geography reading.  Over 700 professionals are here to score over 200,000 exams.  I’ve been delighted in the past to share the Professional Development activities and newsletters and will continue to do so.  This post will be updated throughout the reading (June 2-8).

Source: geographyeducation.org

iScore5

“The app built by expert teachers for savvy students.  Practice hundreds of real AP-style questions. Level-Up from easy to expert; learn while you play.”

Source: www.iscore5.com

With all the great functionality and content of their prior version, iScore5 APHG is now updated (with no more lockouts and practice FRQs with rubrics for users to work through). Available on Apple and Google Play platforms and at a reduced price for bulk purchases. Also available is our AP Psych app, our AP US Government app and very soon for AP World History.

 

Tags: APHG, teacher training, edtech.

Illustrated APHG Textbook

Source: www.illustratedtextbook.com

If you haven’t seen any resources from the Human Imprint, this is a great source of teacher-produced AP Human Geography as well as other social studies.  This new project, the Illustrated Textbook, was created to be a “one-stop-shop for human geography fundamentals” using a fun, graphic style interlaced with content-heavy text.  I’m very excited to see this online textbook continue to unfold. This is definitely on the shortlist of best materials on this site.   

 

Tags: geography educationAPHGinfographic, textbook.

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