Search

GEOGRAPHY EDUCATION

Supporting geography educators everywhere with current digital resources.

Tag

gender

Flawed Justice After a Mob Killed an Afghan Woman

At first, the trial and convictions in the death of Farkhunda Malikzada seemed a victory in the long struggle to give Afghan women their due in court. But a deeper look suggests otherwise.

Source: www.nytimes.com

DISCLAIMER: I strongly recommend that the video not be shown in class (I wouldn’t show the embedded video in my college classes, but I would discuss the article).  The video is as horrific as anything I’ve ever seen and yet I feel compelled to share the story because it is important to understand the cultural and institutional problems of Afghanistan to get a handle on the deeply entrenched issues. This also shows parts of Afghanistan are seeking to make the transition into a more modern society, but there are other elements that are firmly rooted in the past where mob rule was once more easily justified.  

 

Tags: Afghanistan, culture, developmentgender

‘Leftover Women’ in China

“Chinese women face immense pressure to get married before they turn 27. In many Chinese cities, so called marriage markets are a common sight, where parents go to post and match personal ads. A number of brave Chinese women have finally stood up to speak their mind against society’s labels and their parents’ pressures.”

Source: www.youtube.com

This emotional ad about ‘leftover women‘ in China has received a lot of traffic and is now invigorating a national conversation about marriage customs, gendered norms, and cultural expectations.  What isn’t as explicit in the video is how demographic policies and cultural preferences for boys has created the situation that puts added pressure on single women

 

Questions to Ponder: How is this (at least partially) a lingering impact of the One Child Policy?  What traits of traditional Chinese culture led to this current situation?   

 

Tags: gender, folk culture, China, culture, population.

Why China and India face a marriage crisis

“What has lead to this marriage squeeze?  First, millions women have gone ‘missing’. A generation ago, a preference for sons and the greater availability of prenatal screening meant first Chinese couples, then Indian ones, started aborting female fetuses and only giving birth to boys. At its extreme, in parts of Asia, more than 120 boys were being born for every 100 girls. Now, the generation with distorted sex ratios at birth is reaching marriageable age. The result is that single men far outnumber women.”

 

Tags: gender, ChinaIndia, culture, population.

Source: www.youtube.com

The Arctic Suicides: It’s Not The Dark That Kills You

Greenland has the world’s highest suicide rate. And teen boys are at the highest risk.

 

Like native people all around the Arctic — and all over the world — Greenlanders were seeing the deadly effects of rapid modernization and unprecedented cultural interference. American Indians and Alaska Natives (many of whom share Inuit roots with Greenlanders) had already seen many of their communities buckle under the same pressures.

Source: www.npr.org

This is an incredibly tragic story; if I could add one word to the sub-title, it would read, “It’s not JUST the dark the kills you.”  I’m not an environmental determinist, but we can’t pretend that the climate/darkness don’t play some role in Greenland having 6x the suicide rates of the United States.  See also this article/photo gallery about a similar suicide problem in the indigenous far north of Canada.    

 

Tags: Greenland, Arctic, genderpodcast, indigenous.

The No Good, Very Bad Outlook for the Working-Class American Man


The U.S. economy once worked like a finely meshed machine. Not anymore. The U.S. economy is still a powerful engine, but workers aren’t seeing the benefits, less-educated men are struggling, and the rich have disconnected from everyone else.

Seth Dixon, Ph.D.‘s insight:

The problems with the economy are not universally spread throughout society.  Certain segments are impacted more than others by the current struggles, especially when with look at axes of identity, such as class, gender and ethnicity.  While planning on a blue-collar job in the 1950s could have been a solid career plan for a young man in the United States, not so in the 21st century.

Tags: labor, gender, class, industry, education.

See on nationaljournal.com

Linguistic Geography: My Fair Lady

This is a most decidedly dated reference for pop culture, but a great movie for making explicit the idea that the way we speak is connected to where we’ve lived (also a good clip to show class differences as well as gender norms). The clip highlights many principles and patterns for understanding the geography of languages.

Tags: Language, class, gender, culture, historical, London, unit 3 culture and place.

See on www.youtube.com

Sex and World Peace

Via Scoop.itGeography Education

Sex and World Peace (9780231131827): Valerie M. Hudson, Bonnie Ballif-Spanvill, Mary Caprioli, Chad F. Emmett

I have not yet had the opportunity to read this book but feel that it touches on some of the core issues in geography today: gender, culture and political stability (plus, it’s just a great title).  The authors of Sex and World Peace explore the relationships between cultural norms regarding gender and political stability and war.  They show that security for women translates to security for the state. According to the authors, they “compare micro-level gender violence and macro-level state peacefulness in global settings…[and] mount a solid campaign against women’s systemic insecurity, which effectively unravels the security of all.”

Written by professors in geography, political science and psychology, Sex and World Peace is the synthesis of years of research produced by the WomanStats project.  For more about this ongoing project and the great database which they have produced (loaded with potential for student projects) see: http://womanstats.org/

Via www.amazon.com

For Afghan Policewomen, Sex Abuse Is A Job Hazard

Via Scoop.itGeography Education
The Afghan security forces now include hundreds of women, but they can face significant risks. In the northern city of Mazar-e-Sharif, policewomen say abuse is widespread and even includes rape by their male colleagues.  

Warning: this podcast is an uncomfortable listen, but truly highlights how different a world it can be for women in countries with rigid gender norms.  Gender norms and public space play a critical role in how many societies think about what is often considered “appropriate” behavior.

Discussion Points: what efforts should be encouraged in Afghanistan to prevent this sort of problem?  WHO should be sponsoring these efforts for them to be most successful? How might a ‘good plan on paper’ backfire if you don’t understand the cultural geography of the region?
Via www.npr.org

Blog at WordPress.com.

Up ↑